Research Library

2016
China's Urban Communities: Concepts, Contexts, and Well-Being
Forsyth, Ann, Peter G. Rowe, and Har Ye Kan. 2016. China's Urban Communities: Concepts, Contexts, and Well-Being. Berlin: DeGruyter. Publisher's Version Abstract

Cities in China are extremely dynamic and experience high pressure to grow, transform and adapt. But in what directions, on what basis and to which goals? The authors and their team have researched the intensive transformation processes of about twenty-five neighborhood communities that were created in Beijing, Shanghai, Shenzhen, and Suzhou in the last thirty years, ranging from inner-city to peripheral areas, starting from planning and leading up to user satisfaction studies. This in-depth overview on neighborhood typology and development in China follows the book Emergent Architectural Territories in East Asian Cities by Peter Rowe, who is among the world’s best scholars on urban transformation in East Asia, together with his colleagues Ann Forsyth and Har Ye Kan.

Rape during Civil War
Cohen, Dara Kay. 2016. Rape during Civil War. Ithaca: Cornell University Press. Publisher's Version Abstract

 

Rape is common during wartime, but even within the context of the same war, some armed groups perpetrate rape on a massive scale while others never do. In Rape during Civil War Dara Kay Cohen examines variation in the severity and perpetrators of rape using an original dataset of reported rape during all major civil wars from 1980 to 2012. Cohen also conducted extensive fieldwork, including interviews with perpetrators of wartime rape, in three postconflict counties, finding that rape was widespread in the civil wars of the Sierra Leone and Timor-Leste but was far less common during El Salvador's civil war.

Cohen argues that armed groups that recruit their fighters through the random abduction of strangers use rape—and especially gang rape—to create bonds of loyalty and trust between soldiers. The statistical evidence confirms that armed groups that recruit using abduction are more likely to perpetrate rape than are groups that use voluntary methods, even controlling for other confounding factors. Important findings from the fieldwork—across cases—include that rape, even when it occurs on a massive scale, rarely seems to be directly ordered. Instead, former fighters describe participating in rape as a violent socialization practice that served to cut ties with fighters’ past lives and to signal their commitment to their new groups. Results from the book lay the groundwork for the systematic analysis of an understudied form of civilian abuse. The book will also be useful to policymakers and organizations seeking to understand and to mitigate the horrors of wartime rape.

 

Image of book cover of Global History, Globally
Beckert, Sven, and Seth Rockman, ed. 2016. Slavery's Capitalism: A New History of American Economic Development. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press. Publisher's Version Abstract

During the nineteenth century, the United States entered the ranks of the world's most advanced and dynamic economies. At the same time, the nation sustained an expansive and brutal system of human bondage. This was no mere coincidence. Slavery's Capitalism argues for slavery's centrality to the emergence of American capitalism in the decades between the Revolution and the Civil War. According to editors Sven Beckert and Seth Rockman, the issue is not whether slavery itself was or was not capitalist but, rather, the impossibility of understanding the nation's spectacular pattern of economic development without situating slavery front and center. American capitalism—renowned for its celebration of market competition, private property, and the self-made man—has its origins in an American slavery predicated on the abhorrent notion that human beings could be legally owned and compelled to work under force of violence.

Drawing on the expertise of sixteen scholars who are at the forefront of rewriting the history of American economic development, Slavery's Capitalism identifies slavery as the primary force driving key innovations in entrepreneurship, finance, accounting, management, and political economy that are too often attributed to the so-called free market. Approaching the study of slavery as the originating catalyst for the Industrial Revolution and modern capitalism casts new light on American credit markets, practices of offshore investment, and understandings of human capital. Rather than seeing slavery as outside the institutional structures of capitalism, the essayists recover slavery's importance to the American economic past and prompt enduring questions about the relationship of market freedom to human freedom.

 

Lamont, Michèle, Matthew Clair, and Caitlin Daniel. 2016. “Destigmatization andHealth: Cultural Constructions and the Long-term Reduction of Stigma.” Social Science & Medicine 1 (10).
Lamont, Michèle, Mabel Berezin, Alonzo Plough, and Matthew Trujillo. 2016. “Mutuality, Mobilization, and Messaging for Health Promotion: Toward Collective Cultural Change.” Social Science and Medicine, no. Special Issue.
Lamont, Michèle, Jonathan J. B Mijs, and Elyas Bakhtiari. 2016. “Neoliberalism and SymbolicBoundaries in Europe: Global Diffusion, Local Context, Regional Variation.” Socius: Sociological Research for a Dynamic World 2: 1-8.
Domínguez, J.I., and Rafael Fernández de Castro, ed. 2016. “The Changes in the International System since 2000.” Contemporary U.S.-Latin American Relations: Cooperation or Conflict in the 21st. Century, edited by J.I. Domínguez and Rafael Fernández de Castro, 1-29. New York: Routledge.
Domínguez, Jorge I., and Rafael Fernández de Castro, ed. 2016. “U.S.-Mexican Relations: Coping with Domestic and International Crises.” Contemporary U.S.-Latin American Relations: Cooperation or Conflict in the 21st. Century, edited by Jorge I. Domínguez and Rafael Fernández de Castro, 30-61. New York: Routledge.
Norris, Pippa. 2016. “Electoral integrity in East Asia.” Taiwan Journal of Democracy 12 (1): 1-18.
Norris, Pippa. 2016. “Why electoral integrity matters.” International Political Science Review.
Domínguez, J.I., and Rafael Fernández de Castro. 2016. “The Changes in the International System since 2000.” Contemporary U.S.-Latin American Relations: Cooperation or Conflict in the 21st. Century, 1-29. New York: Routledge.
book cover for Cultural Backlash
Norris, Pippa, and Andrea Abel van Es., ed. 2016. Checkbook Elections: Political Finance in Comparative Perspective. New York: OUP.
Contemporary U.S.-Latin American Relations: Cooperation or Conflict in the 21st. Century
Domínguez, Jorge I., and Rafael Fernández de Castro. 2016. Contemporary U.S.-Latin American Relations: Cooperation or Conflict in the 21st. Century. Routledge.
Norris, Pippa. 2016. “Electoral integrity and electoral systems.” Oxford Handbook of Electoral Systems, edited by Erik S. Herron, Robert J. Pekkanen, and Matthew S. Shugart. New York: Oxford University Press.
Norris, Pippa. 2016. “Electoral integrity and voting behavior.” Routledge Handbook on Voting Behavior and Public Opinion, edited by Mark Franklin. New York: Routledge.
Norris, Pippa, and Yun-han Chu. 2016. “Electoral integrity in East Asia.” Routledge Handbook on Democratization in East Asia, edited by Tun-jen Cheng. New York: Routledge.
Norris, Pippa. 2016. “Electoral transitions: Stumbling out of the gate.” Rebooting Transitology - Democratization in the 21st Century. Routledge.
Norris, Pippa, and Ronald Inglehart. 2016. “Human Security and Social Trust.” Bringing Culture Back In: Culture and Liberal State Orders. Aarhus: Aarhus University Press.
Norris, Pippa, and Andrea Abel van Es., ed. 2016. “‘Introduction’ and ‘Conclusions’.” Checkbook Elections: Political Finance in Comparative Perspective, edited by Pippa Norris and Andrea Abel van Es.. New York: OUP.

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