Harvard University's research center dedicated to confronting
complex international, transnational, global, and comparative issues. | Since 1958 

Latest Epicenter Blog Post

Map of India's states and disputed territories
S M T W T F S
1
 
2
 
3
 
4
 
5
 
6
 
7
 
8
 
9
 
10
 
11
 
12
 
13
 
14
 
15
 
16
 
17
 
18
 
19
 
20
 
21
 
22
 
23
 
24
 
25
 
26
 
27
 
28
 
29
 
30
 
31
 
 
 
 
 

The Weatherhead Center only holds events during the academic year. If you would like to be notified of our events, sign up for our weekly e-newsletter, or follow us on Twitter and Facebook.

@HarvardWCFIA

Latest News

More<embed>
Copy and paste this code to your website.

Latest Books

Not Enough: Human Rights in an Unequal World
Moyn, Samuel. 2018. Not Enough: Human Rights in an Unequal World. Harvard University Press. Publisher's VersionAbstract

The age of human rights has been kindest to the rich. Even as state violations of political rights garnered unprecedented attention due to human rights campaigns, a commitment to material equality disappeared. In its place, market fundamentalism has emerged as the dominant force in national and global economies. In this provocative book, Samuel Moyn analyzes how and why we chose to make human rights our highest ideals while simultaneously neglecting the demands of a broader social and economic justice.

In a pioneering history of rights stretching back to the Bible, Not Enough charts how twentieth-century welfare states, concerned about both abject poverty and soaring wealth, resolved to fulfill their citizens’ most basic needs without forgetting to contain how much the rich could tower over the rest. In the wake of two world wars and the collapse of empires, new states tried to take welfare beyond its original European and American homelands and went so far as to challenge inequality on a global scale. But their plans were foiled as a neoliberal faith in markets triumphed instead. 

International Organizations and the Media in the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries: Exorbitant Expectations
Brendebach, Jonas, Martin Herzer, and Heidi J.S. Tworek, ed. 2018. International Organizations and the Media in the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries: Exorbitant Expectations. Routledge. Publisher's VersionAbstract

International Organizations and the Media in the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries is the first volume to explore the historical relationship between international organizations and the media. Beginning in the early nineteenth century and coming up to the 1990s, the volume shows how people around the globe largely learned about international organizations and their activities through the media and images created by journalists, publicists, and filmmakers in texts, sound bites, and pictures.

The book examines how interactions with the media are a formative component of international organizations. At the same time, it questions some of the basic assumptions about how media promoted or enabled international governance. Written by leading scholars in the field from Europe, North America, and Australasia, and including case studies from all regions of the world, it covers a wide range of issues from humanitarianism and environmentalism to Hollywood and debates about international information orders.

Kissinger the Negotiator: Lessons from Dealmaking at the Highest Level
Sebenius, James K., R. Nicholas Burns, and Robert H. Mnookin. 2018. Kissinger the Negotiator: Lessons from Dealmaking at the Highest Level. HarperCollins Publishers. Publisher's VersionAbstract

Politicians, world leaders, and business executives around the world—including every President from John F. Kennedy to Donald J. Trump—have sought the counsel of Henry Kissinger, a brilliant diplomat and historian whose unprecedented achievements as a negotiator have been universally acknowledged. Now, for the first time, Kissinger the Negotiator provides a clear analysis of Kissinger’s overall approach to making deals and resolving conflicts—expertise that holds powerful and enduring lessons.

James K. Sebenius (Harvard Business School), R. Nicholas Burns (Harvard Kennedy School of Government), and Robert H. Mnookin (Harvard Law School) crystallize the key elements of Kissinger’s approach, based on in-depth interviews with the former secretary of state himself about some of his most difficult negotiations, an extensive study of his record, and many independent sources. Taut and instructive, Kissinger the Negotiator mines the long and fruitful career of this elder statesman and shows how his strategies apply not only to contemporary diplomatic challenges but also to other realms of negotiation, including business, public policy, and law.

Bernardo de Gálvez: Spanish Hero of the American Revolution
Saravia, Gonzalo M. Quintero. 2018. Bernardo de Gálvez: Spanish Hero of the American Revolution. The University of North Carolina Press. Publisher's VersionAbstract
Although Spain was never a formal ally of the United States during the American Revolution, its entry into the war definitively tipped the balance against Britain. Led by Bernardo de Gálvez, supreme commander of the Spanish forces in North America, their military campaigns against British settlements on the Mississippi River—and later against Mobile and Pensacola—were crucial in preventing Britain from concentrating all its North American military and naval forces on the fight against George Washington’s Continental army. In this first comprehensive biography of Gálvez (1746@–86), Gonzalo M. Quintero Saravia assesses the commander’s considerable historical impact and expands our understanding of Spain’s contribution to the war.

 

A man of both empire and the Enlightenment, as viceroy of New Spain (1785@–86), Gálvez was also pivotal in the design and implementation of Spanish colonial reforms, which included the reorganization of Spain’s Northern Frontier that brought peace to the region for the duration of the Spanish presence in North America. Extensively researched through Spanish, Mexican, and U.S. archives, Quintero Saravia’s portrait of Gálvez reveals him as central to the histories of the Revolution and late eighteenth-century America and offers a reinterpretation of the international factors involved in the American War for Independence.

The Greco-German Affair in the Euro Crisis: Mutual Recognition Lost?
Sternberg, Claudia, Kira Gartzou-Katsouyanni, and Kalypso Nicolaidis. 2018. The Greco-German Affair in the Euro Crisis: Mutual Recognition Lost?. Palgrave Macmillan UK. Publisher's VersionAbstract
This book focuses on one of the most highly charged relationships of the Euro crisis, that between Greece and Germany, from 2009 to 2015. It explores the many ways in which Greeks and Germans represented and often insulted one another in the media, how their self-understanding shifted in the process, and how this in turn affected their respective appraisal of the EU and that which divides us or keeps us together as Europeans. These stories illustrate the book’s broader argument about mutual recognition, an idea and norm at the very heart of the European project. The book is constructed around a normative pivot. On one hand, the authors suggest that the tumultuous affair between the two peoples can be read as “mutual recognition lost” through a thousand cuts. On the other, they argue that the relationship has only bent rather than broken down, opening the potential for a renewed promise of mutual recognition and an ethos of “fair play” that may even re-source the EU as a whole. The book’s engaging story and original argument may appeal not only to experts of European politics and democracy, but also to interested or emotionally invested citizens, of whatever nationality.
More

Affiliate Spotlight

Alberto Alesina

Alberto Alesina

Faculty Associate. Nathaniel Ropes Professor of Political Economy, Department of Economics, Harvard University.

Research interests: Political economy; monetary and fiscal policy; and macroeconomics.

Littauer 324
Cambridge, MA 02138
f: (617) 495-7730
p: (617) 495-8388
More