Research Library

2016
Innovation and Its Enemies: Why People Resist New Technologies
Juma, Calestous. 2016. Innovation and Its Enemies: Why People Resist New Technologies. New York: Oxford University Press. Publisher's Version Abstract

The rise of artificial intelligence has rekindled a long-standing debate regarding the impact of technology on employment. This is just one of many areas where exponential advances in technology signal both hope and fear, leading to public controversy. This book shows that many debates over new technologies are framed in the context of risks to moral values, human health, and environmental safety. But it argues that behind these legitimate concerns often lie deeper, but unacknowledged, socioeconomic considerations. Technological tensions are often heightened by perceptions that the benefits of new technologies will accrue only to small sections of society while the risks will be more widely distributed. Similarly, innovations that threaten to alter cultural identities tend to generate intense social concern. As such, societies that exhibit great economic and political inequities are likely to experience heightened technological controversies.

Drawing from nearly 600 years of technology history, Innovation and Its Enemies identifies the tension between the need for innovation and the pressure to maintain continuity, social order, and stability as one of today's biggest policy challenges. It reveals the extent to which modern technological controversies grow out of distrust in public and private institutions. Using detailed case studies of coffee, the printing press, margarine, farm mechanization, electricity, mechanical refrigeration, recorded music, transgenic crops, and transgenic animals, it shows how new technologies emerge, take root, and create new institutional ecologies that favor their establishment in the marketplace. The book uses these lessons from history to contextualize contemporary debates surrounding technologies such as artificial intelligence, online learning, 3D printing, gene editing, robotics, drones, and renewable energy. It ultimately makes the case for shifting greater responsibility to public leaders to work with scientists, engineers, and entrepreneurs to manage technological change, make associated institutional adjustments, and expand public engagement on scientific and technological matters.

The Ethics of Invention: Technology and the Human Future
Jasanoff, Sheila. 2016. The Ethics of Invention: Technology and the Human Future. New York: W.W. Norton & Company. Publisher's Version Abstract

We live in a world increasingly governed by technology—but to what end?

Technology rules us as much as laws do. It shapes the legal, social, and ethical environments in which we act. Every time we cross a street, drive a car, or go to the doctor, we submit to the silent power of technology. Yet, much of the time, the influence of technology on our lives goes unchallenged by citizens and our elected representatives. In The Ethics of Invention, renowned scholar Sheila Jasanoff dissects the ways in which we delegate power to technological systems and asks how we might regain control.

Our embrace of novel technological pathways, Jasanoff shows, leads to a complex interplay among technology, ethics, and human rights. Inventions like pesticides or GMOs can reduce hunger but can also cause unexpected harm to people and the environment. Often, as in the case of CFCs creating a hole in the ozone layer, it takes decades before we even realize that any damage has been done. Advances in biotechnology, from GMOs to gene editing, have given us tools to tinker with life itself, leading some to worry that human dignity and even human nature are under threat. But despite many reasons for caution, we continue to march heedlessly into ethically troubled waters.

As Jasanoff ranges across these and other themes, she challenges the common assumption that technology is an apolitical and amoral force. Technology, she masterfully demonstrates, can warp the meaning of democracy and citizenship unless we carefully consider how to direct its power rather than let ourselves be shaped by it. The Ethics of Invention makes a bold argument for a future in which societies work together—in open, democratic dialogue—to debate not only the perils but even more the promises of technology.

 

Public Debt, Inequality, and Power: The Making of a Modern Debt State
Hager, Sandy Brian. 2016. Public Debt, Inequality, and Power: The Making of a Modern Debt State. Oakland: University of California Press. Publisher's Version Abstract

Who are the dominant owners of U.S. public debt? Is it widely held, or concentrated in the hands of a few? Does ownership of public debt give these bondholders power over our government? What do we make of the fact that foreign-owned debt has ballooned to nearly 50 percent today? Until now, we have not had any satisfactory answers to these questions. Public Debt, Inequality, and Power is the first comprehensive historical analysis of public debt ownership in the United States. It reveals that ownership of federal bonds has been increasingly concentrated in the hands of the 1 percent over the last three decades. Based on extensive and original research, Public Debt, Inequality, and Power will shock and enlighten.

Dictators and Their Secret Police: Coercive Institutions and State Violence
Greitens, Sheena Chestnut. 2016. Dictators and Their Secret Police: Coercive Institutions and State Violence. Cambridge : Cambridge University Press. Publisher's Version Abstract

How do dictators stay in power? When, and how, do they use repression to do so? Dictators and their Secret Police explores the role of the coercive apparatus under authoritarian rule in Asia—how these secret organizations originated, how they operated, and how their violence affected ordinary citizens. Greitens argues that autocrats face a coercive dilemma: whether to create internal security forces designed to manage popular mobilization, or defend against potential coup. Violence against civilians, she suggests, is a byproduct of their attempt to resolve this dilemma. Drawing on a wealth of new historical evidence, this book challenges conventional wisdom on dictatorship: what autocrats are threatened by, how they respond, and how this affects the lives and security of the millions under their rule. It offers an unprecedented view into the use of surveillance, coercion, and violence, and sheds new light on the institutional and social foundations of authoritarian power.

 

On the Move: Changing Mechanisms of Mexico-U.S. Migration
Garip, Filiz. 2016. On the Move: Changing Mechanisms of Mexico-U.S. Migration. Princeton: Princeton University Press. Publisher's Version Abstract

Why do Mexicans migrate to the United States? Is there a typical Mexican migrant? Beginning in the 1970s, survey data indicated that the average migrant was a young, unmarried man who was poor, undereducated, and in search of better employment opportunities. This is the general view that most Americans still hold of immigrants from Mexico. On the Move argues that not only does this view of Mexican migrants reinforce the stereotype of their undesirability, but it also fails to capture the true diversity of migrants from Mexico and their evolving migration patterns over time.

Using survey data from over 145,000 Mexicans and in-depth interviews with nearly 140 Mexicans, Filiz Garip reveals a more accurate picture of Mexico-U.S migration. In the last fifty years there have been four primary waves: a male-dominated migration from rural areas in the 1960s and '70s, a second migration of young men from socioeconomically more well-off families during the 1980s, a migration of women joining spouses already in the United States in the late 1980s and ’90s, and a generation of more educated, urban migrants in the late 1990s and early 2000s. For each of these four stages, Garip examines the changing variety of reasons for why people migrate and migrants’ perceptions of their opportunities in Mexico and the United States.

Looking at Mexico-U.S. migration during the last half century, On the Move uncovers the vast mechanisms underlying the flow of people moving between nations.

 

China's Urban Communities: Concepts, Contexts, and Well-Being
Forsyth, Ann, Peter G. Rowe, and Har Ye Kan. 2016. China's Urban Communities: Concepts, Contexts, and Well-Being. Berlin: DeGruyter. Publisher's Version Abstract

Cities in China are extremely dynamic and experience high pressure to grow, transform and adapt. But in what directions, on what basis and to which goals? The authors and their team have researched the intensive transformation processes of about twenty-five neighborhood communities that were created in Beijing, Shanghai, Shenzhen, and Suzhou in the last thirty years, ranging from inner-city to peripheral areas, starting from planning and leading up to user satisfaction studies. This in-depth overview on neighborhood typology and development in China follows the book Emergent Architectural Territories in East Asian Cities by Peter Rowe, who is among the world’s best scholars on urban transformation in East Asia, together with his colleagues Ann Forsyth and Har Ye Kan.

Rape during Civil War
Cohen, Dara Kay. 2016. Rape during Civil War. Ithaca: Cornell University Press. Publisher's Version Abstract

 

Rape is common during wartime, but even within the context of the same war, some armed groups perpetrate rape on a massive scale while others never do. In Rape during Civil War Dara Kay Cohen examines variation in the severity and perpetrators of rape using an original dataset of reported rape during all major civil wars from 1980 to 2012. Cohen also conducted extensive fieldwork, including interviews with perpetrators of wartime rape, in three postconflict counties, finding that rape was widespread in the civil wars of the Sierra Leone and Timor-Leste but was far less common during El Salvador's civil war.

Cohen argues that armed groups that recruit their fighters through the random abduction of strangers use rape—and especially gang rape—to create bonds of loyalty and trust between soldiers. The statistical evidence confirms that armed groups that recruit using abduction are more likely to perpetrate rape than are groups that use voluntary methods, even controlling for other confounding factors. Important findings from the fieldwork—across cases—include that rape, even when it occurs on a massive scale, rarely seems to be directly ordered. Instead, former fighters describe participating in rape as a violent socialization practice that served to cut ties with fighters’ past lives and to signal their commitment to their new groups. Results from the book lay the groundwork for the systematic analysis of an understudied form of civilian abuse. The book will also be useful to policymakers and organizations seeking to understand and to mitigate the horrors of wartime rape.

 

Image of book cover of Global History, Globally
Beckert, Sven, and Seth Rockman, ed. 2016. Slavery's Capitalism: A New History of American Economic Development. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press. Publisher's Version Abstract

During the nineteenth century, the United States entered the ranks of the world's most advanced and dynamic economies. At the same time, the nation sustained an expansive and brutal system of human bondage. This was no mere coincidence. Slavery's Capitalism argues for slavery's centrality to the emergence of American capitalism in the decades between the Revolution and the Civil War. According to editors Sven Beckert and Seth Rockman, the issue is not whether slavery itself was or was not capitalist but, rather, the impossibility of understanding the nation's spectacular pattern of economic development without situating slavery front and center. American capitalism—renowned for its celebration of market competition, private property, and the self-made man—has its origins in an American slavery predicated on the abhorrent notion that human beings could be legally owned and compelled to work under force of violence.

Drawing on the expertise of sixteen scholars who are at the forefront of rewriting the history of American economic development, Slavery's Capitalism identifies slavery as the primary force driving key innovations in entrepreneurship, finance, accounting, management, and political economy that are too often attributed to the so-called free market. Approaching the study of slavery as the originating catalyst for the Industrial Revolution and modern capitalism casts new light on American credit markets, practices of offshore investment, and understandings of human capital. Rather than seeing slavery as outside the institutional structures of capitalism, the essayists recover slavery's importance to the American economic past and prompt enduring questions about the relationship of market freedom to human freedom.

 

Lamont, Michèle, Matthew Clair, and Caitlin Daniel. 2016. “Destigmatization andHealth: Cultural Constructions and the Long-term Reduction of Stigma.” Social Science & Medicine 1 (10).
Lamont, Michèle, Mabel Berezin, Alonzo Plough, and Matthew Trujillo. 2016. “Mutuality, Mobilization, and Messaging for Health Promotion: Toward Collective Cultural Change.” Social Science and Medicine, no. Special Issue.
Lamont, Michèle, Jonathan J. B Mijs, and Elyas Bakhtiari. 2016. “Neoliberalism and SymbolicBoundaries in Europe: Global Diffusion, Local Context, Regional Variation.” Socius: Sociological Research for a Dynamic World 2: 1-8.
Domínguez, J.I., and Rafael Fernández de Castro, ed. 2016. “The Changes in the International System since 2000.” Contemporary U.S.-Latin American Relations: Cooperation or Conflict in the 21st. Century, edited by J.I. Domínguez and Rafael Fernández de Castro, 1-29. New York: Routledge.
Domínguez, Jorge I., and Rafael Fernández de Castro, ed. 2016. “U.S.-Mexican Relations: Coping with Domestic and International Crises.” Contemporary U.S.-Latin American Relations: Cooperation or Conflict in the 21st. Century, edited by Jorge I. Domínguez and Rafael Fernández de Castro, 30-61. New York: Routledge.
Norris, Pippa. 2016. “Electoral integrity in East Asia.” Taiwan Journal of Democracy 12 (1): 1-18.
Norris, Pippa. 2016. “Why electoral integrity matters.” International Political Science Review.
Domínguez, J.I., and Rafael Fernández de Castro. 2016. “The Changes in the International System since 2000.” Contemporary U.S.-Latin American Relations: Cooperation or Conflict in the 21st. Century, 1-29. New York: Routledge.
book cover for Cultural Backlash
Norris, Pippa, and Andrea Abel van Es., ed. 2016. Checkbook Elections: Political Finance in Comparative Perspective. New York: OUP.
Contemporary U.S.-Latin American Relations: Cooperation or Conflict in the 21st. Century
Domínguez, Jorge I., and Rafael Fernández de Castro. 2016. Contemporary U.S.-Latin American Relations: Cooperation or Conflict in the 21st. Century. Routledge.
Norris, Pippa. 2016. “Electoral integrity and electoral systems.” Oxford Handbook of Electoral Systems, edited by Erik S. Herron, Robert J. Pekkanen, and Matthew S. Shugart. New York: Oxford University Press.

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