Research Library

Beckert, Sven. 2015. “Book review: ‘Empire of Cotton: A Global History,’ by Sven Beckert.” Washington Post. Publisher's VersionAbstract

Global history is very much the fashion in leading university history departments today. Some of them seek to replace courses in Western civilization with classes in global history—but usually such courses have to be team-taught by a variety of specialists, since so few individual academics have such a broad reach. “Empire of Cotton” proves Sven Beckert one of the new elite of genuinely global historians.

Beckert, Sven. 2015. “Insights from the Academy: Review of Sven Beckert's Empire of Cotton: A Global History.” MSNBC. Publisher's VersionAbstract

Book review of Sven Beckert's Empire of Cotton: A Global History.

Beckert, Sven. 2015. “The Turbulent Reign of King Cotton: The Dark History of One of the World’s Most Important Commodities.” The Spectator. Publisher's VersionAbstract

A review of Empire of Cotton by Sven Beckert reveals that while Britain abolished the slave trade in the early 19th century, 50 years later its cotton industry still depended on American slave-labour.

Beckert, Sven. 2015. “Cotton, A Global History: Spinning tales.” The Economist. Publisher's VersionAbstract

Good economic history tells dramatic stories of ingenuity and aspiration, greed and national self-interest. Sven Beckert writes good economic history. But why cotton? Mr Beckert’s answer is that for 900 years, until 1900, it was the world’s most important manufacturing industry. Cotton is relevant now because the story explains how and why an industry goes global. It is a story of wildly fluctuating fortunes, from stunning wealth to dire social disasters.

Pande, Rohini. 2015. “Keeping Women Safe: Addressing the Root Causes of Violence Against Women in South Asia.” Harvard Magazine. Publisher's VersionAbstract

In December 2012, thousands of protesters flooded the streets of cities across India, demanding a safer environment for women. A 23-year-old female student had died from injuries sustained 13 days earlier, when six men raped and savagely beat her on a Delhi bus. The case gained international attention, and since then South Asian media have reported dozens more horrifying instances of violence against women, several involving tourists: a Danish woman was gang-raped in Delhi after asking for directions back to her hotel, and an American was raped while hitchhiking in the Himalayas.

Norris, Pippa, Richard W. Frank, and Ferran Martinez i Coma, ed. 2014. “Advancing Electoral Integrity.” Oxford University Press.
Harley, Alicia, Sharmila Murthy, Laura Diaz Anadon, Gabriel Chan, Kira Matus, Suerie Moon, Vanessa Timmer, and William C Clark. 2014. “Innovation and Access to Technologies for Sustainable Development: A Global Systems Perspective.” Innovation and Access to Technologies for Sustainable Development: A Global Perspective. Cambridge, MA. Publisher's VersionAbstract

This workshop report is a summary of themes discussed by five panels during a daylong workshop on “Innovation and Access to Technologies for Sustainable Development: A global Perspective” at Harvard University on April 24, 2014. The workshop brought together a diverse group of scholars to explore how the technological innovation needed for sustainable development can be promoted in ways that assure equitable access in current and future generations.

Three key themes that emerged from the workshop include: (1) The central role of power, politics and agency in analyzing technological innovation and sustainable development—an important aspect of this includes the articulation of the roles of actors and organizations within frameworks and models of innovation systems. (2) The importance of focusing both on supply-push and demand-pull mechanisms in innovation scholarship and innovation policy. (3) The need to focus more innovation scholarship around the goals of sustainable development.

Frieden, Jeffry. 2014. “The Crisis and Beyond: Prospects for International Economic Cooperation.” Ministero dell'Economia e delle Finanze and Centre for Economic Policy Research Joint Conference. Harvard DASH repositoryAbstract

An integrated world economy requires cooperation among major economic powers. Without determined cooperation among the principal powers, globalization is unlikely to survive the inevitable shocks to which it is subjected.

The world faces a difficult adjustment to reduce the macroeconomic imbalances that were a major cause of the current crisis. This means reducing the surpluses of the major surplus countries in East Asia and Europe, and reducing the deficits of the major deficit countries in North America and Europe. Both processes require substantial domestic economic changes; economies and people will be tempted to turn inward, and governments will be tempted to reduce the priority they give to their external ties. This increases the risks of a breakdown in international cooperation.

Historical precedent is instructive. During the interwar period, a global macroeconomic imbalance was a major cause of the eventual economic catastrophe. During the 1920s, Germany borrowed heavily from the United States. But when a crisis hit, it turned out that neither country was politically prepared to maintain cooperative policies. Americans, focused on domestic concerns, were unwilling to help work out a cooperative resolution of the crisis. Germany exploded into social and political unrest and ended up in the hands of rabid nationalists and protectionists. The problem was political: a lack of domestic support for the sacrifices necessary to maintain international cooperation.

As the crisis winds down and post-crisis adjustment begins, major governments will be challenged to work together to support a well-functioning international economy. They will need to address the concerns of constituents who will chafe at the economic changes forced upon them. Governments that can build domestic political support for international economic engagement will be in a stronger position to work to sustain an integrated global economy.

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Nunn, Nathan, and Nancy Qian. 2014. “US Food Aid and Civil Conflict.” American Economic Review. Publisher's Version
Airoldi, Adele. 2014. The European Union and the Arctic: Developments and Perspectives 2010–2014. Copenhagen: Nordisk Ministerråd. Publisher's VersionAbstract

The report analyses the policy statements on Arctic issues released from 2010 by the EU institutions and the EU’s role-building in the Arctic political framework, notably the Arctic Council. It describes how the EU’s role in the Arctic is seen in strategies and policy papers of Member States, and reports on the EU’s relations with other Arctic actors, particularly indigenous peoples. It gives an overall view of the status of the main EU policies with relevance for the Arctic and identifies the main challenges the EU has to face for progressing to an integrated and coherent Arctic policy.

Leaning, Jennifer. 2014. The Political Origins of Health Inequity: Prospects for Change. The Lancet. 383rd ed. The Lancet–University of Oslo Commission on Global Governance for Health, 630–67. Publisher's VersionAbstract

Despite large gains in health over the past few decades, the distribution of health risks worldwide remains extremely and unacceptably uneven. Although the health sector has a crucial role in addressing health inequalities, its eff orts often come into confl ict with powerful global actors in pursuit of other interests such as protection of national security, safeguarding of sovereignty, or economic goals. This is the starting point of The Lancet–University of Oslo Commission on Global Governance for Health. With globalisation, health inequity increasingly results from transnational activities that involve actors with diff erent interests and degrees of power: states, transnational corporations, civil society, and others. The decisions, policies, and actions of such actors are, in turn, founded on global social norms. Their actions are not designed to harm health, but can have negative side effects that create health inequities. The norms, policies, and practices that arise from global political interaction across all sectors that affect health are what we call global political determinants of health.

Norris, Pippa, and Mona Lena Krook. 2014. “Beyond quotas: Strategies to promote gender equality in elected office.” Political Studies 62 (1): 1-19.
Norris, Pippa, Ferran Martinez i Coma, and Richard W. Frank. 2014. “Measuring electoral integrity around the world: A new dataset.” PS: Political Science & Politics 47 (4): 1-10.
Banerjee, A., D. Green, J. McManus, and R. Pande. 2014. “Are Poor Voters Indifferent to Whether Elected Leaders are Criminal or Corrupt? A Vignette Experiment in Rural India.” Political Communications 31 (3): 391-407.PDF icon Download PDF
Warikoo, N., and S. Deckman. 2014. “Beyond the Numbers: Institutional Influences on Experiences with Diversity on Elite College Campuses.” Sociological Forum 29 (4): 959-981. Publisher's Version
Feigenberg, B., E. Field, R. Pande, N. Rigol, and S. Sarkar. 2014. “Do Group Dynamics Influence Social Capital Gains Among Microfinance Clients? Evidence From a Randomized Experiment in Urban India.” Journal of Policy Analysis and Management 33 (4): 932-949.PDF icon Download PDF
Frankel, J. 2014. “Effects of Speculation and Interest Rates in a "Carry Trade" model of Commodity Prices.” Journal of International Money and Finance 42: 88-112.Microsoft Office document icon Download PDF
Warikoo, N., and C. Fuhr. 2014. “Legitimating Status: Perceptions of Meritocracy and Inequality among Undergraduates at an Elite British University.” British Education Research Journal 40 (4): 699-717. Publisher's Version
Frankel, J. 2014. “Nominal GDP Targeting for Middle-Income Countries.” Central Bank Review 14 (3): 1-14. Publisher's Version
Frankel, J. 2014. “Sustainable Cooperation in Global Climate Policy: Specific Formulas and Emission Targets.” Climate Change Economics 5 (3). Publisher's Version