Research Library

2014
Norris, Pippa. 2014. “‘Political Communication.’ Chapter 19.” Comparative Politics, 3rd ed. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
Norris, Pippa, and Mona Lena Krook. 2014. “Women as political leaders worldwide: Barriers and opportunities.” Women in Elected Office, 3rd ed. New York: Oxford University Press.
Norris, Pippa, Richard W. Frank, and Ferran Martinez i Coma, ed. 2014. “Advancing Electoral Integrity.” Oxford University Press.
Norris, Pippa, Lawrence Leduc, and Richard Niemi, ed. 2014. Comparing Democracies 4: Elections in a Changing World. 4th ed. London: Sage.
Norris, Pippa. 2014. Why Electoral Integrity Matters. New York: Cambridge University Press.
Banerjee, A., D. Green, J. McManus, and R. Pande. 2014. “Are Poor Voters Indifferent to Whether Elected Leaders are Criminal or Corrupt? A Vignette Experiment in Rural India.” Political Communications 31 (3): 391-407. Download PDF
Frankel, J. 2014. “Become an International Economist, See the World.” Eminent Economists II. Cambridge University Press. Publisher's Version
Warikoo, N., and S. Deckman. 2014. “Beyond the Numbers: Institutional Influences on Experiences with Diversity on Elite College Campuses.” Sociological Forum 29 (4): 959-981. Publisher's Version
Feigenberg, B., E. Field, R. Pande, N. Rigol, and S. Sarkar. 2014. “Do Group Dynamics Influence Social Capital Gains Among Microfinance Clients? Evidence From a Randomized Experiment in Urban India.” Journal of Policy Analysis and Management 33 (4): 932-949. Download PDF
Frankel, J. 2014. “Effects of Speculation and Interest Rates in a "Carry Trade" model of Commodity Prices.” Journal of International Money and Finance 42: 88-112. Download PDF
Warikoo, N., and C. Fuhr. 2014. “Legitimating Status: Perceptions of Meritocracy and Inequality among Undergraduates at an Elite British University.” British Education Research Journal 40 (4): 699-717. Publisher's Version
Frankel, J. 2014. “Nominal GDP Targeting for Middle-Income Countries.” Central Bank Review 14 (3): 1-14. Publisher's Version
Frankel, J. 2014. “Sustainable Cooperation in Global Climate Policy: Specific Formulas and Emission Targets.” Climate Change Economics 5 (3). Publisher's Version
Dragusanu, Raluca, Daniele Giovannucci, and Nathan Nunn. 2014. “The Economics of Fair Trade.” Journal of Economic Perspectives 28: 217-236. Publisher's Version
Nunn, Nathan, and Nancy Qian. 2014. “US Food Aid and Civil Conflict.” American Economic Review. Publisher's Version
Lamont, Michèle. 2014. “How Do University, Higher Education and Research Contribute to Societal Well-Being?.” Higher Education in Societies: A Multi Scale Perspective. Boston: Sense Publishers. Publisher's VersionAbstract

It has been a real pleasure for me to come to the CHER 2013 conference held in Lausanne. I first would like to thank Christine Musselin, as the CHER president, and Gaële Goastellec, as the conference organiser, for their invitation to think more systematically about the question of the potential impact of University, Higher Education and Research on the well-being of societies. This theme is particularly important to me as over the last years, my research has converged around the issue of societal well-being on the one hand, and on peer review on the other. I am thrilled that the CHER invitation has given me the opportunity to make connections between two of my main research lines, which have been pursued largely independently of one another until today.

Lamont, Michèle, and Nicolas Duvoux. 2014. “How Neo-Liberalism has Transformed France’s Symbolic Boundaries?.” French Politics, Culture & Society 32 (2): 57-75. Publisher's VersionAbstract

This paper considers changes in the symbolic boundaries of French society under the influence of neoliberalism. As compared to the early nineties, stronger boundaries toward the poor and Blacks are now being drawn while North-African immigrants and their offsprings continue to be largely perceived as outside the community of those who deserve recognition and protection. Moreover, while the social reproduction of upper-middle class privileges has largely remained unchanged, there is a blurring of the symbolic boundaries separating the middle and working class as the latter has undergone strong individualization. Also, the youth is now bearing the brunt of France’s non-adaptation to changes in the economy and is increasingly marginalized. The result is a dramatic change in the overall contours of the French symbolic community, with a narrowed definition of cultural membership, and this, against a background of growing inequality, unemployment, and intolerance in a more open and deregulated labor market.

Lamont, Michèle, Charles Camic, and Neil Gross. 2014. “Looking Back at Social Knowledge in the Making.” Sociologica 2.Abstract

We are grateful to Matteo Bortolini for initiating a symposium around Social Knowledge in the Making (SKM). As a collective project, this book was with us for several years and was a welcomed opportunity for stimulating dialogue between the three co-editors. It is with pleasure that we now respond to Matteo’s invitation to reflect on the fate of the adventure two years after the book’s publication. We address how it has been received, whether the reception has met our expectations, and respond to the specific reactions of Kelly Moore, Johannes Angermuller, and Kristoffer Kropp published in this symposium. We appreciate that these talented sociologists of the social sciences and the humanities took on the challenge of engaging our work.

Lamont, Michèle. 2014. “Reflections Inspired by Ethnic Boundary Making: Institutions, Power, Networks by Andreas Wimmer.” Ethnic and Racial Studies 37 (5): 814-819. Publisher's VersionAbstract

This essay engages with Wimmer’s Ethnic Boundary Making to consider how cultural processes feed into inequality. It describes the strengths of the book, relates it to my early work, and draws on Lamont, Beljean, and Clair (forthcoming), to describe two types of identification processes (racialization and stigmatization) and two types of rationalization processes (standardization and evaluation) that contribute to an understanding of the relationship between symbolic and social boundaries. It stresses similarities and differences between approaches and suggests possible points for convergence.

Leaning, Jennifer. 2014. The Political Origins of Health Inequity: Prospects for Change. The Lancet. 383rd ed. The Lancet–University of Oslo Commission on Global Governance for Health, 630–67. Publisher's VersionAbstract

Despite large gains in health over the past few decades, the distribution of health risks worldwide remains extremely and unacceptably uneven. Although the health sector has a crucial role in addressing health inequalities, its eff orts often come into confl ict with powerful global actors in pursuit of other interests such as protection of national security, safeguarding of sovereignty, or economic goals. This is the starting point of The Lancet–University of Oslo Commission on Global Governance for Health. With globalisation, health inequity increasingly results from transnational activities that involve actors with diff erent interests and degrees of power: states, transnational corporations, civil society, and others. The decisions, policies, and actions of such actors are, in turn, founded on global social norms. Their actions are not designed to harm health, but can have negative side effects that create health inequities. The norms, policies, and practices that arise from global political interaction across all sectors that affect health are what we call global political determinants of health.

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