Special Event

Feb 25

Special Event: Women and Public Policy Program

11:40am to 1:00pm

Location: 

Harvard Kennedy School, Taubman Building, WAPPP Cason Conference Room (102)

"Two Decades of Gender-Role Attitude Change in Europe"

Speaker:

Mary C. Brinton, Faculty Associate. Reischauer Institute Professor of Sociology, Department of Sociology, Harvard University.

This seminar explores the assumption of many cross-national studies that gender-role attitudes fall along a single continuum between traditional and egalitarian. Brinton analyzes over-time data from 18 European countries and identifies trajectories of attitudinal change. Brinton demonstrates that while traditional gender-role attitudes have precipitously and uniformly declined, European nations are not converging towards one dominant egalitarian model but instead are diverging across three distinct varieties of egalitarianism.

Co-sponsored by the Weatherhead Initiative on Gender Inequality and the Women and Public Policy Program (WAPPP), Harvard Kennedy School.

Contact:

Sarah Banse
sarahbanse@wcfia.harvard.edu

Mar 10

Special Event: Salafiyya Lecture and Workshop

5:00pm to 6:30pm

Location: 

Center for Middle Eastern Studies, 38 Kirkland Street

“How did Salafism Become an Ideology?”

Speaker:

Henri Lauziere, Professor of History, Northwestern University.

Co-sponsored by the Center for Middle Eastern Studies, the Department of Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations, the Islamic Legal Studies Program at Harvard Law School, and the Prince Alwaleed bin Talal Islamic Studies Program, Harvard University.

Contact:

Sarah Banse
sarahbanse@wcfia.harvard.edu

Feb 11

Special Event: Weatherhead Initiative on Gender Inequality

11:40am to 1:00pm

Location: 

Harvard Kennedy School, Taubman Building, WAPPP Cason Conference Room (102)

"New Evidence Against a Causal Marriage Wage Premium"

Speaker:

Alexandra Killewald, Associate Professor of Sociology, Department of Sociology, Harvard University.

Could marriage be associated with increases in men’s wages? Recent research claims that men’s long-term wage benefits from marriage are as high as 20%. They begin prior to marriage, as they anticipate marriage or experience wage benefits of unmarried partnership. In this seminar, Killewald challenges those findings and argues instead that marriage has no causal effect on men’s wages in either the short- or long-term. Rather, research on the marriage wage premium has overlooked literature in other subfields suggesting that marriage occurs when wages are already and unusually, rapidly rising. A vast literature documents that economic circumstances influence men’s decisions when to marry, suggesting that wages may affect marriage, rather than the reverse. Using data from the NLSY79, Killewald concludes that these observed wage patterns are most consistent with men marrying at a time that their wages are already rising and divorcing when their wages are already falling, with no additional causal effect of marriage on wages.

Co-sponsored by the Weatherhead Initiative on Gender Inequality and the Harvard Kennedy School, Women and Public Policy Program (WAPPP).

Contact:

Sarah Banse
sarahbanse@wcfia.harvard.edu

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